Papier

Found this nice little in-browser editor through HN:

http://getpapier.com/

Features
– Your thoughts are backed up directly to Chrome: no account or syncing.
– Here are some handy shortcuts for you. Take notes ⌘B, ⌘I, ⌘U, ⇧⌘S
– Choose Day 🌤 or Night 🌕 mode
– Count the number of characters 🔢
– You can print your note

It has most of the things that Poe currently does, and a few that it will have in the next version. It doesn’t save your work, so you must export it to keep anything you write. This is a fairly big hole in functionality, something that could be easily fixed by leveraging localStorage.

It’s pretty though, and I like how simple it is. Simple is good.

Impostor Syndrome – an analogy and pep talk – Mary Robinette Kowal

Mary Robinette Kowal, author, narrator, puppeteer, and caster-of-pods over at writing excuses, has this to say about “imposter syndrome” on her blog today. We’ve probably all felt this at one point or another. I know I have.

I’ve just given the same pep talk to three different writers, so I figure you probably need it to. Let me speak to you about impostor syndrome. That thing where you are sure everyone knows you’re faking it and they are going to find out any minute and then you will be cast down and …

Source: Impostor Syndrome – an analogy and pep talk – Mary Robinette Kowal

What Kind of Name Is That? The Perils of Naming Fictional Characters

An interesting look into naming fictional characters. I always have trouble with this. Something else they don’t mention are the perceived problems of giving a character the same first name to someone you know, and then worrying that they’ll think the character is based on them. Yes, I overthink things. That’s the key to a good procrastinator

How to name your fictional characters.Characters in need of names.To me the most embarrassing part of writing fiction, aside from telling people about it, is naming your characters. Of course, even “real” names are made up, but in life our names are things we can alter only with a great deal of paperwork; in fiction, writers… Read More »

Source: What Kind of Name Is That? The Perils of Naming Fictional Characters

Instead of Said

There are two schools of thought when it comes to writing dialogue tags. There’s the opinion that you should never use anything other than “said”. Elmore Leonard famously said ‘Never use a verb other than said to carry dialogue’.

And then there’s the opinion – that you should use anything but said. He replied. She gasped. He recalled. She muttered.

I’m of the opinion that these are different styles, and that a writer can opt for whichever style they please.

In either case, using “said” is definitely the easy option. If you want to avoid it, you need a list of alternatives.

Here’s a good list:
Writing Aid  – Instead of Said